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Fava Dip

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings:
500 g yellow split peas
1.5 pcs onion (peeled & roughly chopped)
5 pcs Garlic cloves
3-4 stems fresh thyme
1 stem fresh rosemary
2 tablespoons Olive oil
1 teaspoon Salt
Black pepper
Topping
0.5 pcs Onion chopped
60 g cherry tomatoes
4 teaspoons Olive oil
20 ml lemon juice

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Fava Dip

Features:
  • Vegan
Cuisine:

Fava dip is an incredibly tasty, creamy dish, widespread in traditional Greek cuisine. It is a hummus-like dip that can be prepared quickly and easily. Consisting of vegetables only, it is a great choice for vegans.

  • 60
  • Serves 4
  • Easy

Ingredients

  • Topping

Directions

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Fava dip is an incredibly tasty, creamy dish, widespread in traditional Greek cuisine. It is a hummus-like dip that can be prepared quickly and easily. Consisting of vegetables only, it is a great choice for vegans.

The name fava comes from the Latin word favus meaning broad bean. In the beginning, fava was made of broad bean and eventually replaced with yellow shelled lentil, since it is easier to digest. Hence the misnomer.

Fava Dip Origin

Yellow lentil from Santorini island is especially popular. Due to the abundance of sunshine and rich volcanic soil, the lentil of the time was recognized throughout Greece, but also beyond. The European Union even awarded it the label of Protected Designation of Origin.

Yellow lentil has been grown there for several millennia. In recent archaeological excavations, the remains of a settlement dating from 1600 BC have been found. As the settlement was destroyed in a volcanic eruption, evidence of life and customs is well preserved. One such insight is the existence of lentil plants.

Fava is common throughout the year, in addition to meat, fish and even vegetable dishes. In Santorini, there is summer or “married” one, which is prepared with the addition of red sauce capers. Also, there is a winter fava which is made with the addition of smoked and fried pork – kavourmas.

It is especially popular and common during Lent when people try to refrain from eating meat.

Although fava is indeed an original Greek traditional dish, other cuisines have similar dishes. Hummus is generally super popular in Egypt, Israel, Palestine, and the Middle East. In India, the same thing is with dal, although it is more in the form of soup.

I tried Fava several years ago when I was in Greece, more precisely in Thessaloniki. Although this dish is more common on the islands, it was excellent here as well. I received a recipe for fava from a local seller, who kindly shared his fava secret.

Steps

1
Done

Rinse the yellow split peas in warm water well and cook over moderate heat. Boil for 25-30 minutes and periodically remove the foam which is formed during boiling.

2
Done

Add onion, garlic, thyme and rosemary. Cook for another 20 minutes, until the water is almost evaporated. Season with salt and pepper.

3
Done

When the yellow peas and vegetables are cooked remove the thyme and rosemary. Add a few tablespoons of olive oil and mix well in a blender until you got a thick mixture. That's it - you got the fava.

4
Done

What you will serve it with is your choice, but I prefer it with chopped onion, cherry tomatoes and some olive oil and lemon juice.

Ivan Majhen

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