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Imam Bayildi

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings:
2 pcs large aubergine
4 pcs Garlic cloves chopped
2 pcs tomatoes (peeled deseeded and chopped)
1 teaspoon fresh parsley (chopped)
1 teaspoon fresh mint (chopped)
1 teaspoon sugar
350 ml Olive oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Black pepper
Salt

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Imam Bayildi

Cuisine:

Imam Bayildi is a traditional Turkish dish made from eggplant stuffed with vegetables and topped with olive oil. The stuffing is mostly made from tomatoes, garlic, parsley, onions and herbs.

  • 75
  • Serves 4
  • Easy

Ingredients

Directions

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Imam Bayildi is a traditional Turkish dish made from eggplant stuffed with vegetables and topped with olive oil. The stuffing is mostly made from tomatoes, garlic, parsley, onions and herbs.

It can be served hot or cold and is most often served as an appetiser or part of an appetiser mix called meze.

Imam Bayildi is not habitual dish only in Turkish cuisine. An almost identical dish, even under a similar name, can be found in Armenian, Greek, Albanian, Macedonian, Bulgarian, Israeli cuisine and in the Arab world.

Imam Bayildi Origin

The origin of this dish, as is usually the case with traditional recipes, is not entirely clear. However, it is thought to have originated sometime in the 17th century.  The name of the dish itself is fascinating.

It translates as “Imam fainted” or even better “Imam swooned”. There are two different but similar legends about the origin of the name.

The first one says that a local imam (cleric) got married and when his wife prepared this meal, he passed out due to pleasure.

The second version says, was that he also got married, but he didn’t know his wife was a great cook. She brought 12 jars of finest olive oil as the dowry. She prepared this dish for him, and after tasting it, he was delighted and was looking for more. For the next eleven days, she made him the same meal. On the thirteenth day, he was not greeted by his favourite eggplants. The reason was that all the olive oil had been consumed. When he found out, the imam fainted, realizing the value he had spent in 12 days.

The Turkish language is actually full of these witty ambiguous phrases and sentences.

Now I understand why imam fainted. This dish is amazing, but you will use a lot of olive oil.

Steps

1
Done

Peel the aubergines with a vegetable peeler so you get a zebra look like on the image. Halve them lengthwise into two parts. You can use four smaller instead of two large aubergines, but in that case, you prepare them whole. I prefer halved ones because they give me a better visual appearance.

2
Done

Sprinkle the aubergines with salt and allow 15 minutes for the salt to draw moisture from them. Be sure to wipe them off with a paper towel. Otherwise, they will be soggy.

3
Done

In a frying pan, heat the olive oil and fry the aubergines on both sides. Fry for 4-5 minutes until they start to get brown colour. When done, remove them from the oil and set aside.

4
Done

In the second frying pan, we will now prepare the stuffing. Heat a little olive oil and sauté onion, garlic and tomato. Season with salt and pepper and finally add the spices - sugar, cinnamon, parsley and mint.

5
Done

Make a notch through the centre of the aubergine and fill it with stuffing.

6
Done

Lay the stuffed aubergines in a baking tray. If there is stuffing leftover, put it in the baking tray next to them. Pour over some more olive oil and lemon juice.

7
Done

Cover and place in the oven to bake for approx. 40-45 min at 160 degrees.

8
Done

Remove from oven and allow to cool and then cover with the liquid left from baking.

9
Done

Imam Bayildi is usually served cold and is additionally garnished with chopped fresh parsley. Yoghurt also goes excellent with this dish.

Ivan Majhen

Recipe Reviews

Average Rating:
(5)
Total Reviews: 1
jole2611

Nisam znao da postoji ovo jelo. Odlična stvar, jednostavno za napraviti.

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